Streaming Content Question

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
12 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Streaming Content Question

Fletch-2
Hi All,
 
I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
 
1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?
 
2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?
 
Cheers - Fletch

--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

FTired
Administrator
I am sure they care, especially BBC cause they have license issues.

In addition with Murdoch wanting this paywall thing to take off, he would love to put video content behind a paywall, i.e if he can restrict that content being redistributed without money, he should.

What they will pay, I think its best to license the tech to them based on country/region, then vertical, i.e sports etc, and then per view they get...basically take him for all he's got :-)

I.



From: Fletch <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Mon, 26 April, 2010 14:11:30
Subject: [entrepreneur-1056] Streaming Content Question

Hi All,
 
I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
 
1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?
 
2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?
 
Cheers - Fletch

--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by iqbalgandham ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about iqbalgandham, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

Geoff Wright
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
Yes they'll kick your ass if you do that. MAJORLY

I don't think they'd be interested. They can monetize it themselves + you don't know what they're working on. Blinkx, truveo are the extent of this space I think...

Geoff

On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 2:11 PM, Fletch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi All,
 
I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
 
1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?
 
2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?
 
Cheers - Fletch

--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]



--
BR,

Geoff Wright

Affililabs LTD
[hidden email]
t: +44 (0) 7702 405 730
Skype: geoffw8
tw: geoffw8




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Geoff Wright ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Geoff Wright, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

Mike Pollitt
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
Hi Fletch --

Probably important to understand the supply chain, too. For example, BBC and Sky may not always or frequently be the content owner, even though they may have certain obligations to the content owner. Original rights holders may be significantly more motivated to protect their content from piracy than content aggregators such as BBC, Sky or Apple.

So you may have this tension between the optimal point to implement DRM (digital rights management - I assume this is the core of what you're proposing), which might be at the aggregator, and the optimal point to charge the customer (the rights holder).

What would be interesting is technology that could be applied to the content prior to delivery to the aggregator, that would be aggregator-independent, and that would travel with the content such that only a brute-force method (digital equivalent to videoing the computer screen) could remove it.

Against this, there is a trend being led by iTunes to remove DRM altogether, so once again I would suggest more data is needed on the supply chain status quo and general trends before knowing whether this is valuable or not and if so how much each participant might pay.

Cheers,
Mike.

On 26 Apr 2010, at 14:17, iqbalgandham wrote:

> I am sure they care, especially BBC cause they have license issues.
>
> In addition with Murdoch wanting this paywall thing to take off, he would love to put video content behind a paywall, i.e if he can restrict that content being redistributed without money, he should.
>
> What they will pay, I think its best to license the tech to them based on country/region, then vertical, i.e sports etc, and then per view they get...basically take him for all he's got :-)
>
> I.
>
>
> From: Fletch <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Sent: Mon, 26 April, 2010 14:11:30
> Subject: [entrepreneur-1056] Streaming Content Question
>
> Hi All,
>  
> I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
>  
> 1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?
>  
> 2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?
>  
> Cheers - Fletch
>
> --
> Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
> Tel: +44 7518 345679
> Twitter: @fletchnz
>
> Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com
>
> The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.
>
>
>
>
> --
> Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
> This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
> To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
> To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here
>
> Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
>
>
>
>
> --
> Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
> This message was sent by iqbalgandham ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
> To learn more about iqbalgandham, visit his/her member profile
> To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here
>
> Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
http://www.meetup.com/opencoffee/
This message was sent by Mike Pollitt ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Mike Pollitt, visit his/her member profile: http://www.meetup.com/opencoffee/members/11972876/
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here: http://www.meetup.com/opencoffee/settings/
Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

Steve Karmeinsky
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 09:11:28AM -0400, Fletch wrote:

>    Hi All,
>    I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so
>    if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really
>    be appreciated.
>    1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with
>    their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and
>    redistributed?

Of course they care, the BBC have to make the content available to
license payers for 'free' but there make lots of money selling outside
the UK. BSkyB are commercial from the outset.

>    2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream
>    basis) to have this protected from hackers?

I think they probably wont pay anything as they have big dev teams and
deals with various DRM vendors. If it's being hacked, it's because they
don't really care at the moment.

Steve

--
NetTek Ltd  UK mob +44 7775 755503
UK +44 20 7993 2612  /  US +1 310 857 7715  /  Fax +44 20 7483 2455
Skype/GoogleTalk/AIM/Gizmo/.Mac/Twitter/FriendFeed stevekennedyuk
Euro Tech News Blog http://eurotechnews.blogspot.com   MSN [hidden email]



--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
http://www.meetup.com/opencoffee/
This message was sent by Steve Kennedy ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Steve Kennedy, visit his/her member profile: http://www.meetup.com/opencoffee/members/8276455/
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here: http://www.meetup.com/opencoffee/settings/
Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

RE: Streaming Content Question

Christopher Bristow
In reply to this post by Fletch-2

Question 1: Yes

Question 2: As little as possible! Seriously,  without current number of streams and projections of market growth, it is impossible to even guess. My gut feeling is that they wouldn’t want a unit-based model, but rather an outright purchase or annual license. Plus the BBC model is vastly different to Sky.  I would question the value of the hacking – how much does it cost the BBC? I wouldn’t think it was much.

As already mentioned, there are others in the chain who may be more interested.

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Fletch
Sent: 26 April 2010 2:11 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [entrepreneur-1056] Streaming Content Question

 

Hi All,

 

I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.

 

1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?

 

2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?

 

Cheers - Fletch

--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Christopher Bristow ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Christopher Bristow, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

RE: Streaming Content Question

Karen cordingley
In reply to this post by Fletch-2

HI Fletch

Happy to help

Q1- I am not sure whether this is in integral part of the service offering as to date nothing has been hacked to my knowledge but it must only be a matter of time?

Q2 I think they  would pay depending on how the risk is sold- I know someone who is an excellent IT security guru who has advised the city and government bodies should you need this type of input- he would be happy to help

Let me know good luck

Karen

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Fletch
Sent: 26 April 2010 14:12
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [entrepreneur-1056] Streaming Content Question

 

Hi All,

 

I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.

 

1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?

 

2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?

 

Cheers - Fletch

--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Karen cordingley ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Karen cordingley, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

Fletch-2
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
Thanks OC'ers! As usual many different angles covered (all valid) and some good contacts made. Very very much appreciated :-)

On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 2:47 PM, Christopher Bristow <[hidden email]> wrote:

Question 1: Yes

Question 2: As little as possible! Seriously,  without current number of streams and projections of market growth, it is impossible to even guess. My gut feeling is that they wouldn’t want a unit-based model, but rather an outright purchase or annual license. Plus the BBC model is vastly different to Sky.  I would question the value of the hacking – how much does it cost the BBC? I wouldn’t think it was much.

As already mentioned, there are others in the chain who may be more interested.

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Fletch
Sent: 26 April 2010 2:11 PM

Subject: [entrepreneur-1056] Streaming Content Question

 

Hi All,

 

I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.

 

1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?

 

2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers?

 

Cheers - Fletch



--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.





--


Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile

To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Christopher Bristow ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Christopher Bristow, visit his/her member profile

To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]



--
Web: http://blog.mydnd.com
Tel: +44 7518 345679
Twitter: @fletchnz

Grandfather's Biz (c1942): arcltd.blogspot.com

The contents of this email and all its attachments may contain privileged or confidential information. It is intended solely for the ordinary user of the email address to which it was addressed. No one else may copy or forward all or any of it in any form. If you receive this email in error, we would be grateful if you would delete it and call or email the sender.




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Fletch ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Fletch, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

Thai Tran
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 2:11 PM, Fletch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi All,
 
I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
 
1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?

Yes, they care quite a bit.  If you try to license content from a major media organisation, it is not uncommon for them to give you a 10+ page technical document listing in extreme detail how you must protect their content.
 

 2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers? 

Most media organisations currently require that their content be protected using RTMPE which is an encrypted protocol for streaming Flash videos.  The only way to deliver RTMPE streams is to licence a Flash Media Server (FMS) from Adobe.  FMS currently costs US$995 - US$4,500 per server (this is known in the industry as the "Flash Tax").


In practice, websites that need to deliver large volumes of video (e.g. BBC iPlayer) do not buy the FMS themselves, but instead pay a Content Delivery Network (CDN) such as Akamai, Limelight, or Level 3 to deliver the videos.  The CDNs have hundreds of thousands of servers around the world that run FMS.  I believe the CDNs don't pay Adobe a licence fee per server but instead pay Adobe per video stream delivered.  CDNs charge websites somewhere in the range of US$0.015 to US$0.06 per gigabyte delivered -- the fees are a matter of negotiation so the prices are not public.  These fees cover the cost of maintaining the servers, the bandwidth, and the Adobe FMS licencing fees (I would guess the FMS licence is a small fraction of the total fee the CDN charges).



There is a potential business opportunity with the transition to HTML5 video, and Apple is helping to accelerate this by refusing to support Flash on the iPhone OS.  I don't believe there is currently a standard for protecting the delivery of HTML5 videos, though obviously the industry would prefer not to have another proprietary protocol controlled by one company.

Here is an interesting article on the Adobe vs. Apple battle and the implications on the video streaming ecosystem:  http://seekingalpha.com/article/198860-adobe-a-lot-more-at-stake-than-apple-devices




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Thai Tran ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Thai Tran, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

Geoff Wright
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
Thai, thanks for sharing this, I didn't realize there was such a 'space' behind this/how it linked together!

Regards,

Geoff

On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 11:56 PM, Thai Tran <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 2:11 PM, Fletch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi All,
 
I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
 
1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?

Yes, they care quite a bit.  If you try to license content from a major media organisation, it is not uncommon for them to give you a 10+ page technical document listing in extreme detail how you must protect their content.
 

 2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers? 

Most media organisations currently require that their content be protected using RTMPE which is an encrypted protocol for streaming Flash videos.  The only way to deliver RTMPE streams is to licence a Flash Media Server (FMS) from Adobe.  FMS currently costs US$995 - US$4,500 per server (this is known in the industry as the "Flash Tax").


In practice, websites that need to deliver large volumes of video (e.g. BBC iPlayer) do not buy the FMS themselves, but instead pay a Content Delivery Network (CDN) such as Akamai, Limelight, or Level 3 to deliver the videos.  The CDNs have hundreds of thousands of servers around the world that run FMS.  I believe the CDNs don't pay Adobe a licence fee per server but instead pay Adobe per video stream delivered.  CDNs charge websites somewhere in the range of US$0.015 to US$0.06 per gigabyte delivered -- the fees are a matter of negotiation so the prices are not public.  These fees cover the cost of maintaining the servers, the bandwidth, and the Adobe FMS licencing fees (I would guess the FMS licence is a small fraction of the total fee the CDN charges).



There is a potential business opportunity with the transition to HTML5 video, and Apple is helping to accelerate this by refusing to support Flash on the iPhone OS.  I don't believe there is currently a standard for protecting the delivery of HTML5 videos, though obviously the industry would prefer not to have another proprietary protocol controlled by one company.

Here is an interesting article on the Adobe vs. Apple battle and the implications on the video streaming ecosystem:  http://seekingalpha.com/article/198860-adobe-a-lot-more-at-stake-than-apple-devices




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Thai Tran ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Thai Tran, visit his/her member profile

To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]



--
BR,

Geoff Wright

Affililabs LTD
[hidden email]
t: +44 (0) 7702 405 730
Skype: geoffw8
tw: geoffw8




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Geoff Wright ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Geoff Wright, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

john barrett
In reply to this post by Fletch-2


Hi Fletch,

1, yes they do care. they shouldn't, but as always the large corporations are always the slowest to adapt and catch up with new trends. Free online content is the way things are now and that is not going to change. people will always find ways around things, there is some very good video screen capture software available now and the fact that you can just record bbc and sky etc on your DVD player or sky+ and put it online that way just makes the whole exercise completely futile. The fact is that times have changed, people now have the technology to do what 20+ years ago could only be done by these large corporations. And they have got too used to taking full advantage of that fact. They do not like the thought that they have to find new ways and change their business models completely and are trying to hold on to their golden eggs for dear life. Unfortunatly for them, if they do not modernise soon then they will get taken over by smaller fish, like youtube for example.

2, They probably would pay, I mean they went to the trouble of getting the government to change the law to try and preserve their status quo. How much exactly, I couldn't say. If it was on a per stream basis then you would only be looking at pennies per stream, otherwise it wouldn't be worth it to them anyway. Like I said, it would be futile anyway, content will always find a way out(most hollywood films are online before they are in cinemas) so it would be a futile attempt whatever they did. In my opinion they should start looking at new ways to monetize on the content and just give it away free themselves

Interesting that you called them hackers though!


John Barrett.




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by john barrett ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about john barrett, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Streaming Content Question

FTired
Administrator
In reply to this post by Fletch-2
Wow, that was really interesting, I knew about the CDN's, but the html5 problem is an interesting one.

tks Thai

Iqbal



From: Thai Tran <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Mon, 26 April, 2010 23:56:21
Subject: Re: [entrepreneur-1056] Streaming Content Question

On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 2:11 PM, Fletch <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi All,
 
I'm looking for a little bit of feedback for a startup I'm helping, so if you have the time to comment on these 2 questions that would really be appreciated.
 
1, Do you think content owners (like BBC with the iPlayer or Sky with their web player) care that their content can be hacked, stored and redistributed?

Yes, they care quite a bit.  If you try to license content from a major media organisation, it is not uncommon for them to give you a 10+ page technical document listing in extreme detail how you must protect their content.
 

 2. And if so, what do you think they might pay (maybe on a PER stream basis) to have this protected from hackers? 

Most media organisations currently require that their content be protected using RTMPE which is an encrypted protocol for streaming Flash videos.  The only way to deliver RTMPE streams is to licence a Flash Media Server (FMS) from Adobe.  FMS currently costs US$995 - US$4,500 per server (this is known in the industry as the "Flash Tax").


In practice, websites that need to deliver large volumes of video (e.g. BBC iPlayer) do not buy the FMS themselves, but instead pay a Content Delivery Network (CDN) such as Akamai, Limelight, or Level 3 to deliver the videos.  The CDNs have hundreds of thousands of servers around the world that run FMS.  I believe the CDNs don't pay Adobe a licence fee per server but instead pay Adobe per video stream delivered.  CDNs charge websites somewhere in the range of US$0.015 to US$0.06 per gigabyte delivered -- the fees are a matter of negotiation so the prices are not public.  These fees cover the cost of maintaining the servers, the bandwidth, and the Adobe FMS licencing fees (I would guess the FMS licence is a small fraction of the total fee the CDN charges).



There is a potential business opportunity with the transition to HTML5 video, and Apple is helping to accelerate this by refusing to support Flash on the iPhone OS.  I don't believe there is currently a standard for protecting the delivery of HTML5 videos, though obviously the industry would prefer not to have another proprietary protocol controlled by one company.

Here is an interesting article on the Adobe vs. Apple battle and the implications on the video streaming ecosystem:  http://seekingalpha.com/article/198860-adobe-a-lot-more-at-stake-than-apple-devices




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by Thai Tran ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about Thai Tran, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([hidden email])
This message was sent by iqbalgandham ([hidden email]) from London OpenCoffee Meetup.
To learn more about iqbalgandham, visit his/her member profile
To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list settings, click here

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York 10163-4668 | [hidden email]
Loading...